A History of the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association

A History of the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association

A History of the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association

A History of the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association

Synopsis

In 1909, G. Stanley Hall, the founder of the American Psychological Association, invited Sigmund Freud, Sandor Ferenczi, Carl Jung, and Ernest Jones to Clark University to present their understanding of psychoanalysis. Although their presentations were enthusiastically received by many, the discrepancy with what was then considered the mainline American psychological thought was too great and the two fields remained separate.

The formation of the Division of Psychoanalysis in 1979 -- seventy years later -- had as a major goal a rapprochement between psychoanalysis and psychology. Analytically trained psychologists and those seeking training have responded with enthusiasm to the formation of the Division, which now numbers 3,500 members in thirteen short years.

This volume records the history of the Division and the seminal contributions of its founding members. It describes the dynamic tensions that have existed over the years between differing clinical and theoretical concepts of psychoanalysis leading to creative dialogue.

Excerpt

Leopold Caligor
President, Division of Psychoanalysis,
American Psychological Association

In 1909, G. Stanley Hall, the founder of apa, invited Sigmund Freud, Sandor Ferenczi, Carl Jung, and Ernest Jones to Clark University to present their understanding of psychoanalysis. Although their presentations were enthusiastically received by many, the discrepancy with the then-mainline American psychological thought was too great and the two fields remained separate.

The formation of the Division of Psychoanalysis in 1979, 70 years later, had as a major goal a rapprochement between psychoanalysis and psychology. Analytically trained psychologists and those seeking training have responded with enthusiasm to the formation of the Division, which now numbers over 3,500 members in 13 short years.

This volume records the history of the Division and the seminal contributions of its founding members. It describes the dynamic tensions that have existed over the years between differing clinical and theoretical concepts of psychoanalysis leading to creative dialogue.

The Division is proud of its seven Sections, which are described in detail: Psychologist-Psychoanalyst Practitioners; Childhood and Adolescence; Women and Psychoanalysis; Local Chapters; Psychologist-Psychoanalysts' Forum; Psychoanalytic Research Society; and Psychoanalysis and Groups. the Division's 26 local chapters are also described.

The Division's publications are recognized by psychoanalysts, scholars, and psychologists for their outstanding contributions. These include the newsletter, The Psychologist-Psychoanalyst; the journal, Psychoanalytic-Psychology; and Psychoanalytic Abstracts.

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