Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot

Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot

Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot

Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot

Synopsis

Philippa Foot is one of the most original and widely respected philosophers of our time; her work has exerted a lasting influence on the development of moral philosophy. In tribute to her, twelve leading philosophers from both sides of the Atlantic have contributed essays exploring the various topics in moral philosophy to which she has made a distinctive contribution--virtue ethics, naturalism, non-cognitivism, relativism, categorical requirements, and the role of rationality in morality.

Excerpt

Philippa Foot was born in 1920 and educated mainly at home in the country before going up to Somerville College, Oxford, on a scholarship in 1939 to read Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. She has been associated with Somerville ever since. She received her BA with First Class Honours in 1942, her MA in 1947, became Somerville's first philosophy Tutorial Fellow in 1949, and Vice- Principal in 1967.

In 1969 she resigned her tutorial fellowship, becoming a Senior Research Fellow instead, and began to freelance in the USA. She had already held visiting professorships at Cornell and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Between 1969 and 1976 she was a Visiting Professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Washington, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York; the First Senior Visiting Professor in the Society for the Humanities at Cornell; Old Dominion Fellow at Princeton; Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford; and Professor in Residence at UCLA, where she finally settled, as a full Professor, in 1976. In 1988 UCLA appointed her as the first holder of the Gloria and Paul Griffin Chair in Philosophy, a position she held until her retirement in 1991.

In a letter to Oxford University Press in 1991 to explain 'why Philippa Foot is worthy of a Festschrift', Warren Quinn wrote:

no one has stayed at centre-stage in moral theory for such a long period of time. Indeed, far from resting on her impressive past laurels, she is now embarked on her most important and promising work: a book giving a new account of practical reason and its relation to moral action, desire, and happiness. And while she has as yet refused to publish anything of this new account, interest in it is keen in America (where she presented part of it in a series of lectures at Princeton and in the Whitehead Lecture at Harvard), France (where a recent lecture on happiness given in Paris is to be brought out by the Presses Universitaires de . . .

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