Religion, Reason, and Truth: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Religion

Religion, Reason, and Truth: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Religion

Religion, Reason, and Truth: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Religion

Religion, Reason, and Truth: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Religion

Excerpt

The essays in this volume were written independently, to be read as separate pieces. I have, therefore, permitted some repetition to ensure the integrity of their thought and argument.

The Personal and Impersonal in Metaphysics and Theology was originally published under the title Metaphysical Diversity and Cultural Disposition by Philosophy East and West. Theses on the Idea that God Is a Person was first published by the University of Utah Press. Comments on the Meaning of Immortality was published as a Garvin Lecture on God and Immortality. The publishers of these papers have kindly given permission for their reprinting here with some modification.

For his critical comments, I am indebted to Professor John E. Smith of Yale University, who read the manuscript of this volume for the University of Utah Press. Helen Hyer and Jacqueline Jacobsen prepared the manuscript with uncommon care and skill. From past experience, I know that the published volume will exhibit the exceptional artistry in design and typesetting of Donald M. Henriksen and the truly superb editing of Trudy McMurrin.

Needless to say, in my views on the philosophy of religion I have been greatly influenced by my teachers, associates, friends, and family. In accordance with good preface tradition I fully accept censure for my errors, which must be legion, but in deference to my views on causation and human freedom I must insist that these others hold some causal responsibility for my errors as well as for any statements in these essays that may be true or judgments that may be good. I am not willing to let them completely off the hook. To name a few of them and acknowledge my indebtedness calls for a brief confessional statement.

Zelta Ballinger, my English teacher in the seventh, eighth, and ninth grades, a rigorous disciplinarian in intellectual matters, introduced me to the fascinating world of ancient Greek culture; and . . .

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