What Men Live By: Work, Play, Love, Worship

What Men Live By: Work, Play, Love, Worship

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What Men Live By: Work, Play, Love, Worship

What Men Live By: Work, Play, Love, Worship

Read FREE!

Excerpt

In the spring of 1909, I had been gnawing away at three tough and ancient problems which came to me through the Social Service Department of the Massachusetts General Hospital: What is the best way to care for the tuberculous? How can "nervous people" (neurasthenics) be restored to balance and happiness? Where can we find help that is worth offering to a girl facing motherhood without a husband?

A vacation in England that summer took me far enough away from the surface details of these problems to see that the solutions thus far suggested for them all have a strong family likeness and illustrate three stages of opinion.

An institution is our first idea for all these sufferers. A sanitarium for the tuberculous, a nervine for the neurasthenics, a "Rescue Home" for the unmarried mother. This solution contents us for a time, but further experience shows us how limited is the good which an institution can do. Even at its best it is too artificial, too much of a hothouse existence, to accomplish more than the beginning of a cure. The violent herding of special miseries in one place -- disease facing similar disease, day in and day out -- makes physical or moral contagion always a danger, sometimes a fact. More individual attention is needed for each . . .

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