Prosperity Road: The New Deal, Tobacco, and North Carolina

Prosperity Road: The New Deal, Tobacco, and North Carolina

Prosperity Road: The New Deal, Tobacco, and North Carolina

Prosperity Road: The New Deal, Tobacco, and North Carolina

Synopsis

This study is the first to trace a single Agricultural Adjustment Administration commodity program and to assess the impact of a major New Deal program in North Carolina. The freezing of tobacco growing brought prosperity to the growers but little benefit to the small and tenant farmer. Given the problems that affected both AAA policy making and implementation, the New Deas's choice lay not between a limited or a radical program but between the limited program or none at all.

Excerpt

It is a pleasant duty to acknowledge the financial assistance that has enabled me to undertake the research for this book. My first debt is to the Scholarships Committee of the University of Hull, which not only awarded me a three-year research scholarship but paid the travel expenses for my first trip to the United States in August 1969. That I was able in the next thirteen months to complete so much of my work in the primary sources was entirely due to the kindness of Professor Ralph W. Greenlaw, former chairman of the history department, North Carolina State University at Raleigh. The lucrative but undemanding instructorship which he provided allowed me to spend most of my time on research. Subsequent visits back to the United States have been made possible by generous grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Research Committee of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, and the Margaret Gallagher Fund. Many friends by their hospitability increased in a very real sense the value of these awards. None suffered more from my importunate demands than Burton Elliott, Marilyn Dixon, and Sam and Sherri Wells, and without their generosity this book could not have been finished.

The staffs of libraries and archives in New York, North Carolina, and Washington treated me with unfailing courtesy and efficiency. I am particularly grateful for the help and friendly guidance given me in the early stages of my work by H. G. Jones, then Director of the North Carolina State Department of Archives and History, now curator of the North Carolina Collection, and by his former colleague, Fred Coker, who is now at the Library of Congress. I owe a special debt to the late Margaret Birdsong Price of the North Carolina State Library, who . . .

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