Cubans in the United States: A Bibliography for Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1960-1983

Cubans in the United States: A Bibliography for Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1960-1983

Cubans in the United States: A Bibliography for Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1960-1983

Cubans in the United States: A Bibliography for Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1960-1983

Synopsis

Lyn MacCorkle brings together a wide-ranging body of English-language sources pertaining to Cuban American society in a compehensive research bibliography. Some 1,600 references cite journal and periodical articles, dissertations, government reports, conference papers, and unpublished works. Spanish-language bibliographies that contain English-language titles or related Spanish-language works are also cited. The bibliography is divided into seven topical sections that cover the major areas of the Cuban American experience. Included are references to materials on economics, education, public administration, psychology, health, politics, sociology, demographics, as well as selected listings of material on Cubans in the United States prior to 1959.

Excerpt

Geography, politics, and economics have linked the history of Cuba with that of the United States. For over two hundred years relations between the two countries have been characterized by both concurrence and confrontation. Although there was little migration from Cuba to the United States prior to 1959, a precedent did exist for Cubans coming to this country in response to disruptive political and economic events on the island, and there were several well-established Cuban communities in the United States when the post-revolutionary refugee influx began.

In the nineteenth century a cigar industry was imported to the United States from Cuba when high tariff duties imposed by this country after the panic of 1857 severely affected the Cuban industry. Increased tariffs and labor problems on the island encouraged many manufacturers to move their factories to the southern tip of the United States. Key West and later Tampa, Florida, became important cigar-making centers. Ybor City in Tampa was named for a prominent Cuban cigar manufacturer who moved there from Key West in 1885.

The first significant immigration occurred during the first years of the Ten Years War (1868-1878) when some 100,000 Cuban separatists were expelled or fled Spanish repression. The wealthy went to Europe but the major destinations of middle-class professionals and businessmen were cities in the United States, predominately New York, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Boston. The exiled working class settled in Key West, Jacksonville, Pensacola, and Tampa. Independence from Spain was made possible by the support of exiled patriots in the United States such as Jose Marti and Tomas Estrada Palma. These and other eminent Cuban leaders organized and inaugurated from the mainland the final struggle (1885-1898) against Spanish colonialism in Cuba. Many Cubans living in this country repatriated when Cuba . . .

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