Meet the Germans: In Which an American Sees the New Germany through Its People

Meet the Germans: In Which an American Sees the New Germany through Its People

Meet the Germans: In Which an American Sees the New Germany through Its People

Meet the Germans: In Which an American Sees the New Germany through Its People

Excerpt

All said and done, the Little Life of any country is the big life.

Germany does not hide her Little Life, neither does she display it, she simply lives it. In whatever province you go you rarely find anything but friendliness--for each other and for the stranger. During more than a year I met with unfriendliness--directly due to my having been an "enemy" countryman during the War--just once.

In the main, the people are thrifty, frugal and industrious. They have got back their "heart" once more and have regained that extraordinary general feeling of being "one big family" and that sense of working together for the common good. There are marked exceptions to this rule to be seen wherever and whenever politics are concerned. There are forty or more different political parties pulling as many different ways. There is real bitterness and open enmity on the part of the Monarchist and the Communist against their foes. Otherwise, there is a concerted effort in the direction of "progress," which usually means superiority. The German is always aiming at superiority "someday." He knows that Germany can win, it is their destiny! But, unlike the American, he is content to wait--and work for tomorrow. He plants his forests, he plans his libraries, he constructs his buildings for his grandchildren's grandchildren. He does an honest hard day's work with painstaking skill--he owes it to the Vaterland as well as to himself, for they are all working together for "Der Tag! . . ."

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