The University of Chattanooga: Sixty Years

The University of Chattanooga: Sixty Years

The University of Chattanooga: Sixty Years

The University of Chattanooga: Sixty Years

Excerpt

The Commencement of June, 1946, completed the sixtieth year of the institution now known as the University of Chattanooga. This volume was planned to be published in conjunction with the anniversary. Unfortunately, difficulties developed which made postponement of publication necessary. In a sense this was fortunate, as it has given the opportunity to record in this study the happenings of a period during which the fortunes of the University have advanced in more rapid tempo than in any other brief span of its history.

In this fourth decade of the Twentieth Century, change has again definitely revealed itself as the great constant of history. It has thrust itself onto the college campus as it has the market place, the political forum and the religious world. Education has been forced to absorb the demands of the postwar era, demands that have grown because of recognition of its ever-increasing importance in the modern world. The University of Chattanooga along with its sister institutions has accepted the challenge of the new circumstances, but with a minimum of expediency. In the best tradition of the liberal arts, it has attempted to hold to universal academic values and its own historical principles, even as it adjusted itself to an unprecedented situation.

Since the Sixtieth Commencement the University has been confronted by the greatest increase of enrollment in its history. In pre-World War II years, its maximum enrollment for the regular session was approximately 650, divided on a ratio of about 4 men to 3 women. In the fall semester of 1946-1947, registration leaped to 1490, of whom 441 were co-eds. Almost two-thirds of the total number were attending under the privileges extended by the Federal government in recognition of military service. In addition to this number, 202 were enrolled in the Evening College and 32 nurses took training in special classes. Adding these to the 781 students matriculated in the 1946 summer session, which was still being conducted as the 3rd semester in an accelerated program, there was a total of 2473 registrations by 1925 individuals in the opening half of the 61st year of the . . .

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