The Rise of Anglo-American Friendship: A Study in World Politics, 1898-1906

The Rise of Anglo-American Friendship: A Study in World Politics, 1898-1906

The Rise of Anglo-American Friendship: A Study in World Politics, 1898-1906

The Rise of Anglo-American Friendship: A Study in World Politics, 1898-1906

Excerpt

TO-DAY as first principles in foreign policy cease to be merely academic or even parliamentary issues and are again the common concern, history more than ever has a clarifying function to discharge. In any final crisis events must impel the English-speaking peoples to consider afresh not only their individual positions in the world, the kind of international order they each need or desire, but also their relation to each other, how those vital needs or desires can best be fulfilled. Woe to him that is alone when he falleth, said the gentle Preacher of old, for he hath not another to help him up. When there is so much at which to despair Anglo-American friendship still gives hope of an hour less bleak; and it is the object of these pages to examine how from troubled beginnings it became an element of promise to all who cherish freedom and care deeply for the great and menaced heritage of Western society.

My chief obligation in writing this book is to my father, Mr. Louis Gelber, and to my uncle, Mr. Percy Hermant; without their support it could neither have been undertaken nor completed. The Rhodes Trustees have added to a debt already large by making a generous grant towards publication.

At an early stage in my studies I was privileged to have the advice and encouragement of Sir Alfred Zimmern, Montague Burton Professor of International Relations in the University of Oxford; of Mr. B. H. Sumner, Fellow of Balliol; and of Professor N. A. M. MacKenzie, Department of Law, University of Toronto. To Professor George de T. Glazebrook, Department of History, Toronto, I am very grateful for a valuable criticism of the first draft from which this later work has developed. In it, however, there is nothing for which any of them can be held in the least responsible. Lastly, it is a pleasure to acknowledge the kindness shown by every one connected with the Oxford University Press through whose hands the book has passed.

L. M. G.

LONDON, S.W. 1. May 23, 1938.

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