India without Fable: A 1942 Survey

India without Fable: A 1942 Survey

India without Fable: A 1942 Survey

India without Fable: A 1942 Survey

Excerpt

Until, very recently, the word India conjured up in the mind of the average American the vague but exciting image of a fabulous country, a land of mystery and romantic charm. India was the country of Yogis, snake charmers and the rope trick; of jewel-bedecked Maharajas and the Taj Mahal; of British Pukka Sahibs from the pages of Kipling; of the Khyber Pass and the Bengal Lancers; and of that odd little man Gandhi and his loin cloth. India was a land of teeming millions, of bewildering religions and the caste system. It was remote, picturesque, and of no immediate concern to anyone except the British.

Even after the war of 1914-18, during which India contributed generously in troops, money, and supplies to the Allies, she was not regarded as an important factor in world politics. Like the rest of Asia, India was left outside the scope of post-war political reconstruction. President Wilson's 14 points, and all the other programs for national self-determination and more democratic forms of government, did not extend to the colonial world in Africa and Asia, although they inevitably served to stimulate the growth of nationalist aspirations among the colonial and semi-colonial peoples, particularly in China and India. The war of 1914-18 was not . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.