Economics in Uniform: Military Economy and Social Structure

Economics in Uniform: Military Economy and Social Structure

Economics in Uniform: Military Economy and Social Structure

Economics in Uniform: Military Economy and Social Structure

Excerpt

Speaking at Edinburgh on October 12, 1942, Winston Churchill said: "When peaceful people like the British and Americans, who are very careless in peacetime about their defense; carefree, unsuspecting nations and people who have never known defeat; improvident nations, I will say reckless nations, who despised military art and thought war so wicked it never could happen again--when nations like this arc set upon by highly organized and heavily armed conspirators who have been planning in secret over years on end, exalting war as the highest form of human effort, glorifying slaughter and aggression and prepared and trained to the last point to which science and discipline can carry them, it is natural that the peaceful and improvident should suffer terribly."

It is equally clear that the hesitancy of many democracies to learn from other nations has been one of the chief reasons for delay in their countcrblow. This book seeks to derive from the experience of Europe, and that of its Nazi oppressors, certain lessons in military economy and social adjustment which the democratic world must understand if it is to survive the present struggle and if it is to preserve and extend after the war the social values which are implicit in a real victory.

Analogy with Germany or with another country must not be carried too far, and the common sense of the average reader will tell him at once wherein the experience of this country is likely to be different from that of Germany or England. Yet universals can be found in any national experience and--if we have the intelligence to recognize them --can be of priceless value in mastering the problems of another country. Furthermore, in a prolonged war original differences in economic organization tend to disappear, even though many basic philosophies of institutions, nations, governments, or regimes survive.

The term "military economy," which has been employed with increasing frequency in recent literature, covers both war economy proper . . .

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