Rival Partners: America and Britain in the Postwar World

Rival Partners: America and Britain in the Postwar World

Rival Partners: America and Britain in the Postwar World

Rival Partners: America and Britain in the Postwar World

Excerpt

In the war, the two Anglo-Saxon powers, brought together by common peril, worked and fought together with a remarkable degree of harmony. But as peace returned, America and Britain once again became commercial rivals and, taking into account the needs of both countries to pursue foreign trade aggressively, we must not blind ourselves to the danger of serious friction. This danger is enhanced by the present divergence of political trends in the two countries. Steps which any British government, whatever its political creed, would be forced to take to secure that volume of trade without which Britain cannot survive, may appear in American eyes doubly offensive when adopted by an administration which professes socialism. But Britain's swing to the left does not alter the basic problems with which that country is faced; and it is the nature of the problems which will determine their solutions rather than the men responsible for solving them. "Revolutions," Ernest Bevin, Labor Foreign Secretary, is said to have remarked, "do not change geography." Neither do they transform economics. Geographic and economic realities both serve to drive Britain forward along the road to a collective society. As a result of the election that road will be taken directly by men who believe in it, instead of reluctantly by those with a sentimental attachment to an old trail built in the "horse and buggy" era.

Between the time the manuscript of this book was delivered to the publisher and the first galley proofs were . . .

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