Belgian Problems since the War

Belgian Problems since the War

Belgian Problems since the War

Belgian Problems since the War

Excerpt

Little Belgium will never forget what the United States did during the War for the material relief and the moral comfort of her population. The names of President Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Ambassador Brand Whitlock have been given to many streets and places of my native country. America knew and realizes still that the small country which had lived peacefully since 1830, after having been so many times the battlefield of Europe, was really victimized by war and had no part in its responsibilities.

The War has passed and in spite of the sympathy that America retains for Belgium, I fear that Americans are not aware of the conditions which prevail now in King Albert's Kingdom. Yet no country deserves more the attention of the new world--for little Belgium, which sent across the ocean those Huguenot Walloons who were the first to settle in Manhattan, is so different from America! It is old and new Europe at the same time. Two languages, French and Flemish, competing along an internal boundary which has not changed since centuries; two nationalities but one country; and a labor movement which has done marvelous things over the past forty years for the welfare and education of working classes: these are the main features of Belgian public life which we shall study.

I think really that at the Institute of Politics, in Williamstown, among the hills of New England I have seen something of American idealism. On the eve of the World War, the great Italian historian . . .

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