The New Democratic Constitutions of Europe: A Comparative Study of Post-War European Constitutions with Special Reference to Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Finland, the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats & Slovenes and the Baltic States

The New Democratic Constitutions of Europe: A Comparative Study of Post-War European Constitutions with Special Reference to Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Finland, the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats & Slovenes and the Baltic States

The New Democratic Constitutions of Europe: A Comparative Study of Post-War European Constitutions with Special Reference to Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Finland, the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats & Slovenes and the Baltic States

The New Democratic Constitutions of Europe: A Comparative Study of Post-War European Constitutions with Special Reference to Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Finland, the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats & Slovenes and the Baltic States

Excerpt

As a result of the war 1914-18, two of the most important European States were convulsed by internal revolution. At the Peace Conference a general redistribution of territory was made; a number of entirely new States were created; others were so transformed by union with new lands or by loss of old possessions that it was difficult to say whether the identity of the former country remained or whether a new nation had been called into being. No other generation has witnessed the creation of so many States, the establishment of so many new Governments. To the student of political science and constitutional law the years immediately preceding and immediately following the conclusion of peace must be of absorbing interest. His theories of the nature and origin of the State can be tested by practical examples; he can see carried into effect, in all their variety and complexity, the most modern conceptions of the best form of government. The object of this study is to investigate these forms; to trace in them the influence of some general theory; to give expression to any new political ideas, produced by the necessity of devising solutions for unprecedented problems and difficulties; to inquire whether these problems have found an answer in any original practical contribution to the art of government. For this reason attention has been concentrated on a few important aspects by which it was hoped best to illustrate such new tendencies as may exist. No attempt has been made to embark on a systematic investigation of the general principles of constitutional law, or to enter on a detailed description of institutions which, although . . .

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