Musical Chronicle (1917-1923)

Musical Chronicle (1917-1923)

Musical Chronicle (1917-1923)

Musical Chronicle (1917-1923)

Excerpt

Midsummer is not passed before the pestiferous unwelcome hunger gnaws again. Before a twig has turned, it's full awake in you, the damned appetite for concerts, mounting to the skull, enfeebling the silly eye and making it to perceive in the wintry distances, where only frozen fields extend, a dance of golden soloists, a pageant of purple orchestras. But a few weeks since you had thought yourself rid of it forever, and exchanged happy handshakes with yourself on having escaped its fearful clutch. Springtide had found you disabused, a cool and angry shoulder presented to the concert hall. By night the foyer lights might shine, and ladies in red velvet enter in: you were not to be lured to follow on. Had God himself upon the trombone been advertised for only and positively farewell appearance, not even a fainting desire to hear him would have flickered.

You had had enough; enough for always, it seemed. No more would lust for dulcet sounds in concert send you to expend your treasure, to waste many a good evening, and return homeward destroyed. Since there was so little opportunity for satisfactions, stoical resignation had entered in, it seemed, and anesthetized desire. A voice from above had whispered that in all the future years, two or at the most three concerts every year would satisfy completely all the craving left, and unending disappointment no longer be the portion. A respectable quantity of income hitherto charmed under false pretenses into the pouches of managers would . . .

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