Behind the Japanese Mask

Behind the Japanese Mask

Behind the Japanese Mask

Behind the Japanese Mask

Excerpt

Prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor, the American people had been fully aware of the dangers that lurked across the Pacific, but refused to take them seriously. A widespread feeling prevailed that Japan would not dare to challenge the combined might of both England and America. Americans in general preferred to believe that the Japanese had too much sense to undertake, on their own initiative, such a precarious venture. We persisted long in our belief that they could be appeased if only a way could be found whereby they could save their face. To the last the public was lulled to feelings of security by their apparently sincere efforts to arrive at an amicable settlement of their difficulties through diplomatic channels. But all predictions failed. The fall of Manila, Hong- kong, Singapore, Java, Burma, stands out as a stark and undeniable reality. The onward sweep of Japan's armed forces crushed defenses ill prepared to resist such determined assaults by a powerful and well equipped enemy.

Why have the Japanese proved to be so unpredictable? Why has our popular knowledge about them been so inaccurate? Why did the American public underestimate the extent of their preparations for a long and costly war? Why did we delude ourselves with the belief that the Japanese navy would never be able to withstand the onslaught of our own naval . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.