Lessons from Greek Pottery: To Which Is Added a Bibliography of Greek Ceramics

Lessons from Greek Pottery: To Which Is Added a Bibliography of Greek Ceramics

Read FREE!

Lessons from Greek Pottery: To Which Is Added a Bibliography of Greek Ceramics

Lessons from Greek Pottery: To Which Is Added a Bibliography of Greek Ceramics

Read FREE!

Excerpt

No remains of Greek art, with the possible exception of the coins, have been so largely recovered as have the vases. Of the extensive trade carried on by potters in Greek lands down to the beginning of the third century B.C., it is quite impossible for us to form any adequate conception. Wagon loads of Greek potsherds antedating Homer by centuries have been found at Naucratis in the Nile delta, on Samos, Melos, Thera, at Troy, and at Mycenae; and these fragments indicate but imperfectly the wide range that the pottery industry assumed for a thousand years and more before the earliest date which we are able to name in Greek history. From the seventh century B.C., there seems to have been no article in Greek commerce which appealed so generally to the Italian races, and certainly none whose course from Athens to distant lands is so easily traced. The practical and the ornamental were so well combined in the vases that they were sold by the hundreds of thousands, and those recovered from classic soil present an array of testimony on Greek thought and action that has no parallel outside of Greek literature. The fact that these vessels went largely into the home to serve a useful and decorative purpose early induced the artists to paint upon them scenes that appealed to the individual.

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