Jefferson Davis: President of the South

Jefferson Davis: President of the South

Jefferson Davis: President of the South

Jefferson Davis: President of the South

Excerpt

It is an early spring day in the South in a town on a beautiful river--Montgomery, Alabama. A crowd pushes around a building on an eminence, the state capitol. It is a typically Southern capitol, rather small and dingy but with an imposing front of tall white columns, which, seen from the river, look classic and tasteful. The crowd is of the distant past--women in hoop skirts, many of them beautiful; men in black swallow-tailed coats, light trousers, stocks and broad-brimmed hats; negroes in homespun or tatters. It is an excited, voluble, jubilant crowd, fined with that sense of historic crisis which sometimes comes upon men, lifting them above the present and giving them a glance into the future.

Suddenly a rush of men and boys, with a few women, pours from the capitol building.

"The convention has gone into secret session," they explain to the waiting crowd. The doors of the capitol are closed.

Fifteen, twenty minutes pass while the excitement of the crowd grows in intensity. The people seem pleasantly excited: they laugh and jest. The negroes are quite as much . . .

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