Keeping the Faith: Race, Politics, and Social Development in Jacksonville, Florida, 1940-1970

Keeping the Faith: Race, Politics, and Social Development in Jacksonville, Florida, 1940-1970

Keeping the Faith: Race, Politics, and Social Development in Jacksonville, Florida, 1940-1970

Keeping the Faith: Race, Politics, and Social Development in Jacksonville, Florida, 1940-1970

Synopsis

An examination of the political and economic power of a large African American community in a segregated southern city; this study attacks the myth that blacks were passive victims of the southern Jim Crow system and reveals instead that in Jacksonville, Florida, blacks used political and economic pressure to improve their situation and force politicians to make moderate adjustments in the Jim Crow system. Bartley tells the compelling story of how African Americans first gained, then lost, then regained political representation in Jacksonville. Between the end of the Civil War and the consolidation of city and county government in 1967, the political struggle was buffeted by the ongoing effort to build an economically viable African American economy in the virulently racist South. It was the institutional complexity of the African American community that ultimately made the protest efforts viable.
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