Dramaturgical Analysis of Social Interaction

Dramaturgical Analysis of Social Interaction

Dramaturgical Analysis of Social Interaction

Dramaturgical Analysis of Social Interaction

Synopsis

Preface Acknowledgments Part I: Drama, Self, and Audience The Dramaturgical Perspective Types and Divisions of Drama Presentation of Self Teams by Erving Goffman Audience Part II: The Dramatic Production The Actable Idea Staging Actors and Roles New Meanings Part III: Varieties of Enactment Football Victory Celebrations in America by David A. Snow, Louis A. Zurcher, and Robert Peters Protest Demonstration in South Africa, by A. Paul Hare Departures and Arrivals in Sri Lanka by R.S. Perinbanayagam Funerals in America by Ronny E. Turner and Charles Edgley Glossary References Names Index Subject Index About the Authors

Excerpt

This introductory chapter on the dramaturgical pespective begins with a brief summary of the phases in the development of performance. We then review the basic concepts used by Burke, Harré and Secord, Sarbin, and others in dramaturgical analysis. Some of the basic concepts are then depicted in a diagram to illustrate the roles that are played onstage, backstage, Offstage, and in the audience. A subsequent diagram summarizes some of the concepts used to describe levels of role -- and self-involvement. This is followed by a discussion of the extent to which the term "drama" is being used to describe real aspects of social behavior, or whether the term is only used as a metaphor. The last section of the chapter provides an overview of the material in the book.

PHASES IN A PERFORMANCE

An instance of social interaction is a performance. Any performance, including a theatrical one, starts out from an idea about a situation and the action that will unfold within the situation. The idea may be a single image that has the program for action packed into it, much as a symbol in a dream may be a merger of waking events. On the other hand, the idea may be as fully developed as the detailed script for a play, with parts for each member of the cast and stage directions to guide the performance. A single image is more likely to guide the interaction, for a time, in a small informal group, whereas a script guides the interaction in a formal . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.