Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s

Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s

Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s

Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s

Synopsis

This pioneering study presents an overview of the Mexican comic book industry, together with in-depth studies of the best selling Mexican comic books of the 1960s and 1970s. Most of the popular superhero, adventure, humor, romance, political, detective, and Western comic books are described and analyzed in detail, and then discussed in terms of how they reflect both Mexican and United States cultures. The study concludes with a critical discussion of the applicability of the media imperialism hypothesis to the Mexican comic book.

Excerpt

A student's timely, keen observation, combined with our own curiosity, luck, and the willingness of our home institution to support "unorthodox" research, largely account for the original conception of this volume. During the summer of 1975, Orvin Leis, a student who was enrolled in the University of Minnesota-Morris's Summer Program in Cuernavaca, Mexico, observed that if the authors really wanted to understand contemporary Mexican culture they should study comic books, since nearly everyone, even adults, seemed to be reading them. He commented that the superhero comic book Kalimán was particularly popular. a trip into Mexico City to visit the editorial firm that published Kalimán paid unexpected and immediate dividends. a Friday afternoon visit was timed perfectly, as the weekly issue of this comic book had just been sent to press, and Modesto Vázquez R., business manager of Promotora "K" and son of one of the orginal creators of the comic book, was delighted to spend most of the afternoon talking about Kalimán and Mexican comic books in general. He even provided copies of many early and impossible-to-obtain issues. It definitely appeared that if this encounter was not atypical, a major study of a largely overlooked Mexican mass medium might be undertaken.

A generous grant from the Academic Dean's office at the University of Minnesota-Morris and the University of Minnesota's Office of International Programs allowed a return trip to Mexico in the spring of 1976 to further assess the feasibility of a larger study. No Mexican library would admit to owning either current or back issues of Mexican comic books. Later it was discovered quite by accident that the Hemeroteca Nacional, Mexico's National Periodical Library, did possess a collection of Mexican comic books, but the collection was uncatalogued and held in storage, and a researcher was completely dependent on whatever a helpful librarian might retrieve.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.