Doing the Business: Entrepreneurship, the Working Class, and Detectives in the East End of London

Doing the Business: Entrepreneurship, the Working Class, and Detectives in the East End of London

Doing the Business: Entrepreneurship, the Working Class, and Detectives in the East End of London

Doing the Business: Entrepreneurship, the Working Class, and Detectives in the East End of London

Synopsis

In this controversial and original study of policing, class relations and organizations, Hobbs illustrates the culture of London's East End and its relationship with the Criminal Investigation Department of the Metropolitan Police. Both the East Enders and the Metropolitan Police are considered in terms of their relationship with the marketplace and the emergent strategies of negotiation, trading, and entrepreneurship.

Excerpt

How's business? Fine yeah. You know, bits and pieces but things are moving; it's the time of the year really. You just can't tell. People either want the gear or they are throwing it in your face. It's a case of get the stall out, any weather, and punch away, turn over what you can, knock it out, put the frilly stuff on your head and shout and holler. It's a living and I really think that I am going to crack it. This time next year my son, this time next year.

Sammy, who sells ladies' underwear from the back of a van.

It's been quiet; not a lot going on. But what you've got to remember is, I can't just sit back and do nothing. Even if there's not a lot about I still put myself about. Sooner or later I'll get something, a little trade, a deal. Just so long as I'm busy eventually I'll get a little tickle and then it makes it all worthwhile, so long as I keep grafting.

Martin, a Detective Constable who works in East London.

This book is about entrepreneurship, an area, and a specific police culture. Both the area of East London and the culture of the Criminal Investigation Department of the Metropolitan Police are distinctive cultural, geographical, and institutional entities in their own right yet they share certain key characteristics. These characteristics can be located in the anomalous development of one section of the British working class, and in the evolution of a mode of social control that often appears to function in a contrary manner to that of the central police organization. Consequently, the book is about urban life, messy, haphazard, and ultimately perplexing. It is about both formal and informal control strategies and the coercive regulatory power of the market-place.

My analysis reverberates between East London and the CID, but it is not concerned with policing per se. Several excellent observational . . .

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