The Status of Refugees in Asia

The Status of Refugees in Asia

The Status of Refugees in Asia

The Status of Refugees in Asia

Synopsis

This volume surveys some issues of law and policy affecting refugees in the Asian region. The movement and presence of refugees in different parts of the region is surveyed, and the general legal position evaluated--from multilateral treaties to regional and national initiatives. The author surveys a selection of country profiles to illustrate the national implementation of law and policy, and to highlight performance of three Asian countries which have acceded to the 1951 United Nations Refugee Committee assessed: China, Japan, and the Philippines. Attention is given to the five other countries which have not acceded to these instruments--Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand--and current critical refugee problem areas such as Afghanistan and Sri Lanka examined. The book concludes by examining current difficulties with state practice in the region and presents possible solutions and new directions for the future.

Excerpt

This study examines some of the underlying issues concerning the status of refugees in Asia. Laws, policies, and practices are intricately interwoven in the conglomeration of states which constitute the world's most populous continent. Numerically, the majority of the world's refugees are also found in Asia. The research covers the situation until the beginning of 1991.

The study examines law and policy issues affecting refugee movements in Asia. Chapters 1 and 2 survey various factors leading to refugee outflows, and the presence of refugees in different parts of the region. Chapter 3 evaluates the general legal position concerning refugees, ranging from multilateral treaties to regional and national initiatives. The remaining chapters provide a selection of country profiles to illustrate the implementation of law and policy at the national level. The performance of three Asian countries which have acceded to the 1951 United Nations Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol is assessed: namely, China, Japan, and the Philippines. Five other countries which have not acceded to these instruments are then analysed: namely, Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. The final chapter presents a number of conclusions concerning state practice in the region and sets an agenda for the future.

The basic research for this study was the consequence of a United Nations Fellowship which was granted to me in 1985-6 for a sabbatical year at the Refugee Studies Programme of Oxford University. The information was then supplemented and updated with the help of many friends and colleagues.

My heartfelt thanks are conveyed to the following, who offered much advice and help when this study was taking shape: Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Dr Takeo Uchida, Prof. I. Brownlie, Dr Peter North, Prof. James Crawford, J. P. Hocke, Raymond Hall, Shamsul Bari, Gerald Walzer, Mirza Khan, Henry Domzolski, Dr P. V. Quisumbing, Haji Abas Bin Haji Serudin, N. Sopiee, Jusuf Wanandi, K. Kantaadmadja, Clara Joewono, Sabtu Jasin, Prof. Henry Syquia, Prof. M. Feliciano, James Chiew, Chao Hick Tin . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.