King George the Fifth: His Life and Reign

King George the Fifth: His Life and Reign

King George the Fifth: His Life and Reign

King George the Fifth: His Life and Reign

Excerpt

The proposal that both Princes should go together on a cruise round the world--the Cabinet object--Queen Victoria resents their interference--Doubts regarding the seaworthiness of the Bacchante --Sir Henry Ponsonby's dilemma--Summary of the cruise--Lord Charles Scott's instructions--the tattooing incident--Queen Victoria's anxiety regarding their social contacts--Prince George's homesickness--The Bacchante diverted to the Cape--the Queen's fear that the Princes may become involved in hostilities--Majuba--Cetywayo-- Prince George as a midshipman--the Bacchante damaged in a gale-- She puts into King George's Sound--the return journey--Athens and the Greek Royal Family--Back at home--Confirmation of the two Princes.

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WHEN in 1879 the time approached for the Princes to leave the Britannia , Mr Dalton was afflicted by misgivings similar to those which had disturbed him in 1877. Whereas Prince George's development, during the two years he had spent at Dartmouth, had been 'rapid and pronounced' Prince Eddy had not been able as yet to overcome his constitutional lethargy. It had already been agreed that Prince George on leaving the Britannia should go to sea in a training vessel on an extended cruise round the world. Mr Dalton, in a letter of April 9, 1879, urged the Prince of Wales that Prince Eddy should accompany him on this voyage. If the elder boy were separated from his brother and sent to a public school, his backwardness might become more apparent. Moreover, whereas it would be possible carefully to select the sub-lieutenants, the midshipmen and the cadets with whom he would consort in a naval training ship, it would be difficult at a public school to isolate him from all evil associations. Mr Dalton was aware that Prince Eddy was not suited to a naval career and that a long absence in a training ship might interrupt his general education. He proposed to get over this difficulty by attaching to the two Princes Mr John Lawless, an instructor in the Britannia , who could teach them mathematics and navigation, and Assistant Paymaster G. F. Sceales, who had spent his youth in France and . . .

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