Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications

Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications

Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications

Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications

Synopsis

An authoritative study that describes the scientific basis for our knowledge about emotion as it relates specifically to children. Key topics include historical perspectives on emotional intelligence, neurological bases for emotional development, the development of social skills and childhood socialization of emotion, and more. Ideal for professionals in child psychology and education. Index.

Excerpt

So often in the early stages of social innovations individual pioneers labor alone, not realizing that their creative work is part of a larger fabric. This volume represents the fruition of several such separate lines of development, both in theory and in practice, that have only recently come together in a rich convergence. The fields woven together here are as diverse as neuroscience and child development, intelligence theory and practical pedagogy. Their cross-pollination in this volume offers fresh answers to the perennial question, What do children need to learn in order to flourish in fife?

One set of answers to that question has as its background the urgent mission of stemming the rising tide of perils children increasingly face in their adolescent years and beyond: substance abuse, violence, unwanted pregnancy, dropout, teen smoking, depression, and the like. Over the last decade an important new strategy in primary prevention has emerged that uses the schools to help children better master the social and emotional competencies that can inoculate them against these dangers. As is so often the case in educational innovation, the origins of this approach were at first a bit haphazard, taking the form of ad hoc programming for schools, typically focused on targeting a specific hazard, such as preventing drug abuse or violence. Some worked and others did not; a few even made things worse.

A consortium sponsored by the W T. Grant Foundation did a methodical . . .

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