Crosscurrents in the Drama: East and West - Vol. 6

Crosscurrents in the Drama: East and West - Vol. 6

Crosscurrents in the Drama: East and West - Vol. 6

Crosscurrents in the Drama: East and West - Vol. 6

Synopsis

Distinguished scholars and artists consider the mingling of Eastern and Western cultures and traditions in theatre. The divergent cultures of East and West had been completely separated from one another for so long that their mutual discovery, beginning a little more than a hundred years ago, has had fascinating and invigorating results, especially in the drama. This volume gathers papers, discussion notes, and essays on three major topics: Kabuki and the West; Crosscurrents in the Drama: East and West; and Theatrical Influences between East and West: Enrichment through Borrowings, Appropriations, and Misinterpretations.

Excerpt

In April 1997, on the campus of the University of Georgia in Athens, a very exciting conference on the "Crosscurrents in the Drama, East and West" took place. The conference brought together some of the finest scholars and artists who concern themselves with the theme of encounters between the very different theatrical cultures of East and West. These cultures had been for so long so completely separated from one another that their mutual discovery, beginning a little over a hundred years ago, has had fascinating and invigorating results, especially in the drama. Theatre has a wonderful capacity to constantly rediscover itself. That rediscovery can have rich consequences when one culture and its theatre meets another culture and its theatre. Misunderstandings can create highly original new forms and styles. Issues arise out of so-called "cultural imperialism." Is there such a thing as appropriating culture in the sense that imperialism appropriates the resources of colonies? This process of mutual discovery also yields parallels in theatre practices and conventions between East and West over history. These are among the subjects explored in the essays here.

I must express my profound thanks to several people. First of all I am grateful to the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dr. William Prokasy, at the University of Georgia, for the financial support making it possible to bring six distinguished scholars to campus. These experts--James Brandon, Samuel Leiter, Leonard Pronko, Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei, Andrew Tsubaki, and Farley Richmond--participated in a fascinating panel discussion of the conference's theme. Unfortunately, for reasons of space that discussion could not appear in this volume. I thank Farley Richmond for his assistance in naming other leading schol-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.