The Holocaust: Italy's Struggle with the Hapsburg

The Holocaust: Italy's Struggle with the Hapsburg

The Holocaust: Italy's Struggle with the Hapsburg

The Holocaust: Italy's Struggle with the Hapsburg

Excerpt

Frederick Gentz, secretary at the meetings of the Vienna Congress, confided in his friend, the Hospodar of Wallachia, and assured him that the Congress of Vienna, under a gloss of social revival and lasting peace, propped up by the balance of power, was in reality nothing but "a tooth-and-claw struggle on the part of the victors to make the vanquished disgorge his spoil."

Austria, Prussia, Russia and England were the victors, and Napoleon's spoils, the plains, the mountains and the seas of Italy.

This judgment, shared by Joseph de Maîstre, the standard-bearer of absolutism, tallies, in fine, with that of the members of the Congress themselves, and especially with that of de Talleyrand, at that time high-priest of the legitimist doctrine.

We will not stop at trifles, such as the humanitarian declarations of Article 121 of the Records of the Congress, and Article 6 of the Second Treaty of Paris: the successive meetings of Aix, 1818; Troppau, 1820; Lubbiana, 1821; Verona, 1823, open our eyes to the truth. Let us no more be deceived by the "Holy Alliance of Peoples," a kind of evangelical confederation placed under the immediate sovereignty of Jesus Christ. It was so little binding that even the Sultan of Turkey accepted it.

Its tinsel torn off, its rouge removed, the Congress of Vienna (September 184 to June 1815) was nothing . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.