Ending Affirmative Action: The Case for Colorblind Justice

Ending Affirmative Action: The Case for Colorblind Justice

Ending Affirmative Action: The Case for Colorblind Justice

Ending Affirmative Action: The Case for Colorblind Justice

Synopsis

In the 1960s, we resolved as a nation never to judge people by the color of their skin. But today, race-based public policy has once again become the norm, this time under the banner of affirmative action. How, asks Terry Eastland, did such a turnabout take place, and how can we restore colorblind law in America today? In this compelling and powerful book, Eastland lays bare the absurdities and injustices of affirmative action, and presents the strongest case to date for doing away with race-based and gender-based preferences-- a ringing call for all Americans to reclaim our nation's shared values of equal protection under the law, without reference to race, color, creed, gender, or national origin.

Excerpt

When he joined the police department in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1975, Danny O'Connor wanted someday to make sergeant. In 1988, he took a shot at it. Like the other 209 officers competing for 75 promotions, O'Connor completed the written exam and sat for his interview. When his scores on both parts were added to points awarded for seniority and on-the-job performance over the past year, he placed fifty-sixth on the Composite Scores List. The department had indicated that the 75 top-ranked officers on this list would be the ones promoted. O'Connor knew his ranking and thought he had realized his dream. But then affirmative action struck.

When the candidates took the written exam, they were required on the answer sheets to indicate their race and sex. On the basis of this information, the department created a . . .

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