Cow Country

Cow Country

Cow Country

Cow Country

Excerpt

During the era of the cow country, it was customary, in addition to the great roundups -- often covering a vast region and participated in by scores of cattle raisers -- for every ranchman to hold in the autumn a roundup of his own range in order to choose and cut out his merchantable cattle to be sent to market. This was called the "beef roundup" as distinguished from the "calf roundup" held each spring to brand calves. The cattle of an entire range, or a suitable portion of it, were brought together at some central point and the fat, mature animals were cut out and placed in what was known as the "beef herd." After the entire range had been worked, the beef herd was driven to some shipping point and the animals loaded on cars and consigned to a commission house in one of the large market centers to be sold, either for slaughter or to feeders to be finished for market through corn feeding.

In assembling the essays included in this volume, the author has pursued a somewhat similar technique to that of the autumn beef roundup. During the past quarter of a century, he has written and published in different periodicals a number of brief studies dealing with various aspects of ranching in the Great West. Recently it has occurred to him that it might be possible to "round up" these papers and cut out from the total a sufficient number of...

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