New England's Prospect: 1933

New England's Prospect: 1933

New England's Prospect: 1933

New England's Prospect: 1933

Excerpt

"I undertooke this worke . . . because there hath some relations heretofore past the Presse, which have beene very imperfect; as also because there hath beene many scandalous and false reports past upon the Country, even from the sulphurious breath of every base ballad-monger: wherefore to perfect the one, and take off the other, I have laid down the nature of the Country, without any partiall respect unto it."

These remarks from the foreword to William Wood "New England's Prospect," published in London in 1634, well describe the motives that prompted the preparation of the present volume, in which Wood's title has been revived. "Some relations heretofore past the Presse" concerning contemporary New England have indeed been "imperfect." New England has suffered from "the sulphurious breath" of a modern breed of "ballad-monger." The several contributors to "New England's Prospect--1933" have attempted to lay "down the nature of the Country, without any partiall respect unto it"--that is, in a detached spirit of scholarly inquiry. They have tried not to advertise New England nor to glorify it, but to see it as it is.

Several broad fields of inquiry were outlined covering social, economic, and governmental conditions and activities in New England. Each contributor is a specialist in one of these fields and, in connection with it, was invited to discuss contemporary movements and issues that have appeared to him of the first importance. He was asked to give particular attention to the progress of investigation and to gaps that further investigation should fill. He was urged, so far as pertinent, to consider not only issues regarding which New England presents a united front but also the divergent interests of the several communities that make up the larger whole. Finally he was requested to bear in mind conditions beyond New England's borders that affect the destiny of its people.

The book opens with five introductory papers. Dr. Adams interprets the character of the New Englander in the light of history. The editor describes the principal regions into which New England may be split and the landscapes found in each. Dr. Artman and Mr. Filene survey New England's industrial prospects and the problem of unemployment, and Dr. McFall presents a statistical analysis . . .

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