Cyprus and Its People: Nation, Identity, and Experience in an Unimaginable Community, 1955-1997

Cyprus and Its People: Nation, Identity, and Experience in an Unimaginable Community, 1955-1997

Cyprus and Its People: Nation, Identity, and Experience in an Unimaginable Community, 1955-1997

Cyprus and Its People: Nation, Identity, and Experience in an Unimaginable Community, 1955-1997

Synopsis

Considering the aspects of nation, identity and collective experience in the divided island of Cyprus, this book looks at national identity, political possibilities, the location of culture, and social and psychological perspectives.

Excerpt

The essays collected in this volume are the reworked contributions of participants at a three-day interdisciplinary conference entitled "Cyprus and Its People: New Interdisciplinary Perspectives," held at Harvard University on December 1-3, 1994. Recognizing that the Greek and Turkish Cypriot points of view needed to be represented in balanced proportions, and that the major emphasis had hitherto customarily been on political science, the conference organizers encouraged reasoned and productive debate among scholars, junior and senior, from Europe, Cyprus, U.S. and Canada, who have worked on Cyprus in the disciplines of history, anthropology, political science and psychology, sociology, conflict resolution, refugee studies, and literary and cultural studies. Scholars open to interdisciplinary methodologies were especially sought. (Although there was equal representation of both Greek and Turkish Cypriot perspectives, no speaker was an official representative of any government, whether Greek, Turkish or Cypriot. It is regrettable that, primarily for logistical reasons, discussion did not include perspectives from the small Armenian or Maronite communities on the island, which would have greatly enhanced the chosen line of inquiry).

The conference examined Cyprus and its people, the political, social, and historical dimensions of the relations between the two major communities on the island--the Greek and Turkish communities-- their evolution in the face of external intervention, and their past and present cultural and literary interactions. The Conference discussed the role of international politics, in particular the involvement of Greece and Turkey, and the changing relations between the two main communities on the island since 1955, but . . .

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