Regional Integration: The West European Experience

Regional Integration: The West European Experience

Regional Integration: The West European Experience

Regional Integration: The West European Experience

Synopsis

"This book, part of the Integrating National Economies series, examines the evolution of West European integration over the past forty years. William Wallace analyzes the historical circumstances under which the institutions of integration developed, and the internal tensions and contradictions created by the deepening of integration and repeated enlargements. He explains that, in recent years, deep integration has presented a challenge to national identity, forcing policymakers to confront issues of sovereignty, political commitment, and regional balance. Wallace concludes that the European experience provides a number of important, cautionary lessons for those promoting regional integration in the Western Hemisphere and the Asia-Pacific region. However, it does not offer a model that these areas can easily follow. Wallace emphasizes that the experience of West European economic integration during the cold war years will do little to reconcile global and regional integration in the post-cold war world; the political and security concerns are no longer the same. He contends that the international community must develop rules for the new global order without searching for historical parallels - as those creating the institutions of regional integration in Western Europe did in their time." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The European Community (officially the European Union since the ratification of the Maastricht Treaty in 1993) is the oldest and most highly developed example of institutionalized regional integration. Starting with the integration of markets for coal and steel among six countries in the early 1950s, the eu has moved from the shallow integration of dismantling trade barriers to the deep integration of common policies on agriculture, environment, transport, and working conditions. It has also accepted common rules on competition and mergers and financial transfers through a common budget. the law of the eu is directly applied in the domestic courts of member states. the governments and administrations of the member states interact intensively on a range of domestic policies. Attitudes toward further European integration are a major issue in the domestic politics of most member states.

Over the past forty years the eu has also expanded, from its initial six members to nine in 1973 and twelve in 1986. Austria, Finland, Sweden, and Norway completed negotiations for entry in early 1994, to bring membership--subject to approval through popular referenda--to sixteen in January 1995. Following the transformation of East European regimes in 1989-90, a lengthening queue of applicants for the privileges of membership now stretches across central, southeastern, and eastern Europe, raising the prospect that this regional organization will approach twenty-five to thirty member states within the next decade.

Any study of the integration of national economies must therefore pay attention to the West European experience. How far should those . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.