The Athenian Calendar in the Fifth Century: Based on a Study of the Detailed Accounts of Money Borrowed by the Athenian State, I.G.I, 324

The Athenian Calendar in the Fifth Century: Based on a Study of the Detailed Accounts of Money Borrowed by the Athenian State, I.G.I, 324

The Athenian Calendar in the Fifth Century: Based on a Study of the Detailed Accounts of Money Borrowed by the Athenian State, I.G.I, 324

The Athenian Calendar in the Fifth Century: Based on a Study of the Detailed Accounts of Money Borrowed by the Athenian State, I.G.I, 324

Excerpt

The study which is presented in this volume was begun in 1925 when I first approached the problem of determining the amounts of principal and interest recorded in the accounts of state expenditures for the year 426-5 B.C. (I-G. I2, 324). It was soon apparent that no one part of the inscription could be studied independently, and during the summer of 1925 exact copies of all the known fragments were made, and the scope of the work was extended. It was not until 1927, however, that the opportunity presented itself for consistent work with the stones themselves in the Epigraphical Museum at Athens. I am under the greatest obligation to Dr. Basileios Leonardos, the Director of the Museum, for placing at my disposal every possible facility in the course of this investigation and for his permission to make public the results of the study.

One by one the various fragments were assigned to their proper places in the inscription. The restoration of the text depends largely on mathematical calculations, and in so far as this is true it is, I believe, mathematically certain. One fundamental assumption has been made in the calculations which involve maxima and minima, viz., that the length of a prytany may have been as much as forty days or as little as thirty-three days. No one who has studied the problems of the Athenian calendar, I am sure, will consider these limits too conservative.

I wish here to acknowledge my indebtedness to Mr. Jotham Johnson, Fellow of the American School of Classical Studies, for his suggestions relative to the tables presented in the text for the computation of interest, and to Miss Hazel Hansen for her assistance in reading the manuscript in proof and in preparing the index. I wish also to express my gratitude to Mr. H. T. Wade-Gery of Oxford, to Dr. Johannes Kirchner of Berlin, and to Dr. Allen B. West of the University of Cincinnati for many helpful suggestions. I am also under obligation to Dr. H. H. Powers, President of the Bureau of University Travel, and Hon. Frederick W. Griffith of Palmyra, N.Y., for constant interest and assistance in making this study possible, and to Dr. Edward Capps, whose name appears on the page of dedication.

Athens, Greece. April 4, 1928.

B. D. MERITT

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