Liberalism in the South

Liberalism in the South

Liberalism in the South

Liberalism in the South

Excerpt

In undertaking a study of liberal tendencies in the Southern States since the American Revolution the author is aware that he has embarked upon a task of formidable proportions. Involving, as it does, an examination of liberal movements in the fields of politics, education, religion, race relations, industry, literature, journalism, and women's rights over a period of more than a century and a half and throughout an area several times as large as any European country except Russia, this inquiry has necessitated rather extensive research in a number of directions.

At the outset the author was confronted with the problem of determining, for the purposes of this volume, the metes and bounds of "the South." Should he limit his study to the eleven states which comprised the Confederacy, or should he include one or two of the border commonwealths? For various reasons Maryland and Kentucky were the only non-seceding states given serious consideration for inclusion. It was decided to omit the former and to admit the latter. This decision was concededly somewhat arbitrary. Both Maryland and Kentucky are below Mason and Dixon's Line. If the one produced the Confederate battle hymn "Maryland! My Maryland!" and is known in song and story for that delectable Southern dish, fried . . .

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