Freedom and Order: Lessons from the War

Freedom and Order: Lessons from the War

Freedom and Order: Lessons from the War

Freedom and Order: Lessons from the War

Excerpt

Freedom is that through which man is man. But there cannot be personal freedom without there being order in the life of the community. It is the relationship between freedom and order which this book attempts to trace, in concrete nontechnical analyses of the structure of our world, national and international, institutional and spiritual.

The book thus is about quite serious matters. Is it permissible to preface such a book with a few remarks in a lighter vein?

If it were the purpose of a preface to scare the reader this could be done by saying that the dependence of freedom on its opposite, order, is dialectical. No such thing will be said in this book, however; no such word as dialectic will be used.

The word dialectic is a deterrent to modern readers and has become even more a deterrent since it has been appropriated by the Soviet Government as the official term of its official philosophy. The fact that such respectable thinkers as Greek philosophers and Christian apostles and Church fathers have been thinking in dialectical terms does not make the modern reader any less suspicious; if dialectic is not disreputable, it is suspected of being high-brow. But what really is full of dialectic is the life and world of man. What then can a man do if he wants to show his fellowmen certain essential things in the world--e.g., the dialectic of freedom--which are, however, tainted with the ominous name of dialectic? The . . .

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