Animation, Caricature, and Gag and Political Cartoons in the United States and Canada: An International Bibliography

Animation, Caricature, and Gag and Political Cartoons in the United States and Canada: An International Bibliography

Animation, Caricature, and Gag and Political Cartoons in the United States and Canada: An International Bibliography

Animation, Caricature, and Gag and Political Cartoons in the United States and Canada: An International Bibliography

Synopsis

One of four volumes dealing with the world of comic art, this book is a comprehensive, international bibliography dealing with animation, caricature, gag, illustrative, magazine, and political cartoons in the United States and Canada. Reflecting the substantial growth of comic art literature in recent years, it is representative of various types of publications, writing formats and styles, and languages from all over the world. The four volumes attempt for the first time to pull together the massive amount of comic art literature worldwide. Comics-study pioneer Maurice Horn introduces this book, validating the importance of the work in the area of comic art scholarship.

Excerpt

A Foreword by Maurice Horn

As I contemplate with some bemusement and no little sense of awe the gargantuan compilation of titles--from books, monographs, studies, treatises, essays, and articles--that make up Dr. John Lent's four-volume bibliography of comic art, my mind cannot help but race some 30 years back to the time I decided to join the then-fledgling field of comic art study and research. These were humble beginnings indeed, our aims limited, our ambitions small, simply to defend and help rehabilitate the medium on which our imaginations had feasted in our childhood, and which had now become--unfairly, we thought--disreputable. That our efforts would somehow result in part into that multitudinous forest of scholarship and commentary a scant three decades later would have seemed to us well-nigh unthinkable.

Thus the task of studying and researching the vast, almost unexplored, field of comic art began in earnest in the early 1960s, on both sides of the Atlantic, largely in response to the unwarranted (as we saw them) attacks made upon the medium all through the 1950s by psychologists, sociologists, pedagogues, and not a few demagogues intent upon finding a scapegoat for the ills of the times, notably juvenile delinquency. There had been some valiant defenses of the medium (Coulton Waugh The Comics and Stephen Becker Comic Art in America come readily to mind), but these efforts had been spotty, their research questionable and their methodology uncertain. Clearly the job seemed to call for a more concerted effort, to be made by enthusiasts from the outside, not professionals of the medium but former lovers of the comics now grown up, against all predictions of the detractors of the form, into respectable citizens.

In France just such a small band of brothers had organized itself as the Club des Bandes Dessinées ("Comic Strip Club") in 1962; and the following year I received a long missive from Pierre Couperie, the vice-president of the organization, explaining the aims of the Club and asking me to become their correspondent in New York. I was born in . . .

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