Measuring the Employment Effects of Regulation: Where Did the Jobs Go?

Measuring the Employment Effects of Regulation: Where Did the Jobs Go?

Measuring the Employment Effects of Regulation: Where Did the Jobs Go?

Measuring the Employment Effects of Regulation: Where Did the Jobs Go?

Synopsis

An increasing amount of attention has been focused on the employment effect of governmental regulation. Controversy over the implementation and impacts of governmental rules are now central to current public policy debates relating to employment and labor markets. A new policy framework for regulation is needed to make the regulatory decision-making process more responsive to the requirements for economic growth and to the employment effects of regulation. The President and Congress need to provide effective oversight of the process, from the perspective of both a single regulation and a government-wide approach to regulatory planning. Regulatory agencies need to use state-of-the-art analytical tools so that they can better determine the employment effects of their regulatory actions. This book presents a common-sense, albeit highly sophisticated and technical, approach to improving the technical soundness, credibility, and transparency of the regulatory decision-making process.

Excerpt

An increasing amount of attention has been focused in recent years on the employment effects of government regulation. Controversy over the implementation and impacts of government rules (such as the minimum wage, affirmative action, and Davis-Bacon) are now central to current public policy debates relating to employment and labor markets. the purpose of this book is to increase the public dialogue about how to improve consideration of employment impacts in the regulatory decision-making process.

In January 1993, the National Commission for Employment Policy published a study, Measuring Employment Effects in the Regulatory Process: Recommendations and Background Study, that examined the employment impacts of regulation. the commission was an independent federal agency authorized under the Job Training Partnership of 1982. Until its demise on September 30, 1995, the Commission for twenty-two years had analyzed employment and training issues and policies and made recommendations to the president and Congress in areas where policy or programmatic changes would assist the nation's work force in becoming more productively employed. the project director of the commission's study was Nancy A. Bord, visiting fellow, Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation. the other members of the project team were John Addison, Glenn Harrison, and Eva Elisabet Rutstrom, all of the University of South Carolina.

Shortly after the commission's report was published, discussions between Nancy Bord and me led us to conclude that the subject of the report would be of interest to a broader population than those reached by the commission, especially if the information could be presented in a context that provided the reader with a useful background for understanding regulatory policy. That conclusion evolved into further discussions, which eventually resulted in this book. This book differs from the original commission report in three significant ways. It provides an expanded discussion of almost all areas in the original report, including the history . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.