Globalization and the New World Order: Promises, Problems, and Prospects for Africa in the Twenty-First Century

Globalization and the New World Order: Promises, Problems, and Prospects for Africa in the Twenty-First Century

Globalization and the New World Order: Promises, Problems, and Prospects for Africa in the Twenty-First Century

Globalization and the New World Order: Promises, Problems, and Prospects for Africa in the Twenty-First Century

Synopsis

Globalization presents a paradox in light of the tendency toward regionalization in world trade and investment, and the emergence of the three economic super blocs--the Asia-Pacific Rim, North America, and the European Economic Community. The Third World countries and regions in Africa, Latin America, and elsewhere are left out of the action. This work states the fundamental problems that face Africa, draws the attention of the world policy makers to the problems, and proposes answers and solutions.

Excerpt

Literature yields an impressive list of best-selling volumes on the epochal transformation taking place in the world economy and politics. Globalization and the new world order are two appealing concepts in currency that capture the character of this transformation. An inordinate amount of effort in the burgeoning literature is devoted to understanding and analyzing how the transformation affects the economies of the industrialized countries and the nature of their political and economic relations in the post-Cold War world--a world without the Soviet Union. Little effort, if any, has been made to broaden our knowledge of the differential impacts of the globalization process and the new world order on the regions that lie outside of the North America-Western Europe-Asia/Pacific triangle.

Definitely, Africa is not part of this triangular or perhaps unholy alliance. the region has been marginalized in the globalization process and world affairs. As a lost continent in the age of globalization, Africa is treated as a footnote in the history of the epoch-making changes taking place in the contemporary global political economy. Africa is the second largest continent in the world--a continent bigger in land mass than the United States, South America, and Europe combined. the continent contains at least 10 percent of the world population. Yet the region has never been so undermined and underserved. Africa must therefore recreate and redefine itself in light of the ever-changing and unsettling global realities so that it could play a meaningful role in the new world order.

Consequently, debate on whether Africa will survive the unravelling of the globalization and the new world order is a timely one. Africa's problems are legion. No one discipline, theory, or model can fully grasp the complexity and multidimensionality of the crises plaguing the region. Thus, the uniqueness of this volume is that it adopts a multidisciplinary orientation to understanding the . . .

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