Handbook on Risk of AIDS: Injection Drug Users and Sexual Partners

Handbook on Risk of AIDS: Injection Drug Users and Sexual Partners

Handbook on Risk of AIDS: Injection Drug Users and Sexual Partners

Handbook on Risk of AIDS: Injection Drug Users and Sexual Partners

Synopsis

Intravenous drug users account for nearly one-third of the current AIDS cases in the United States--second only to gay males--and are responsible for 72 percent of female and 59 percent of pediatric cases of AIDS. Thus, the National Institute of Drug Abuse launched a major research effort in 1987 to locate hidden users, to see how they function, and to initiate and evaluate strategies and community-based programs in 50 cities and 60 nearby communities around the country in order to lower risks to users and the dangers they pose to others in the population. The result is a comprehensive study that presents the very latest findings and tested conclusions about how to change behaviors positively. This major reference describes the spread of AIDS, patterns of injection drug and crack use and their effects on sex partners, gender issues, demographic and background factors, key uses in drug abuse treatment, outreach and behavior change strategies, how they reduce risk, and a sum-up of the effectivenessof the National AIDS Demonstration Project.

Excerpt

When this reference book is published, more than 200,000 men, women, and children in the United States will have developed acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and all either will have died or will now face death. Of those deaths, 70,000 will be the result of injection drug use. The injection drug user risks infection and death on two counts--either as a consequence of unguarded drug use or in association with unprotected sex. Moreover, the injection drug user threatens the health of the community at large through drug use and sexual behavior. The drug user who enters treatment certainly reduces the threat to self and society, but at any given time, the vast majority of people injecting drugs are not being treated. In fact, a sizable minority of injection drug users never enter drug treatment programs in spite of a long history of injection drug use. These out-of-treatment populations and the sexual partners whose lives they threaten are the special concern of this volume.

Based on data obtained from the National AIDS Demonstration Research Program, sponsored by the National Institute of Drug Abuse, this handbook provides a survey of these populations. Written by participants in the program, the chapters describe the characteristics of these heretofore little-known populations, the strategies used to reach them, and the efforts to reduce risk-taking behavior. The information provided will afford greater opportunities to develop the AIDS prevention programs crucial to the survival of individuals and communities.

Chapter authors represent the 41 projects funded through the National Institute on Drug Abuse to develop, implement, and study innovative strategies for containing the spread of AIDS to injection drug users and from those users to the larger community. In a real sense, the authors are both pioneers and scientists. The outreach/behavior change programs they organized had little benefit of prec-

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