In Remembrance: Archaeology and Death

In Remembrance: Archaeology and Death

In Remembrance: Archaeology and Death

In Remembrance: Archaeology and Death

Synopsis

In recent years, federal and state governments have recognized their responsibility for the protection of unmarked ancient burial grounds that may be threatened by modern land use activities and natural disasters. The editors have compiled case studies that reflect effective answers to removal, analysis, and reburial of human remains by archaeologists. Each study provides fascinating research from the excavation of historic cemeteries, which has added considerable knowledge to our understanding of factors relating to health, disease, and trauma, and the social histories of the diverse human communities occupying North America during the last three centuries. The volume also represents an important resource guide for archaeologists, historians, and other researchers concerning the sensitive treatment of the nation's historic burying grounds and cemeteries exposed by 20th century changes to the landscape.

Excerpt

In recent years, federal and state governments have increasingly recognized their responsibilities to protect unmarked ancient burial grounds that are threatened by modern land-use activities or natural disasters. In Connecticut, the state legislature established a legal and administrative framework for the preservation and conservation of historic cemeteries in 1989. The momentum and development of this important state law reflected the shared concern of the state's Native American and archaeological communities over the heretofore absence of "antiquities" legislation. Statutory roles and responsibilities for the professional management of unmarked burials when threatened with destruction were assigned to the University of Connecticut's Office of State Archaeology and the Connecticut Historical Commission, which serves as the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). These responsibilities include consultation with state and local government officials, property owners, developers, historians, and family descendants. Although special emphasis is placed upon the coordination and appropriate treatment of Native American burials and sacred sites, all ancient burial grounds are afforded professional and technical assistance from our respective offices.

Since the enactment of Connecticut's burial-related legislation, our offices have been involved with the investigation, analysis, and subsequent reburial of more than 80 unmarked burials that had been inadvertently uncovered during construction-related activities. Investigations at the . . .

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