United States-Japan Trade in Telecommunications: Conflict and Compromise

United States-Japan Trade in Telecommunications: Conflict and Compromise

United States-Japan Trade in Telecommunications: Conflict and Compromise

United States-Japan Trade in Telecommunications: Conflict and Compromise

Synopsis

Giving both the U.S. and Japanese viewpoints, this volume analyzes the friction in telecommunications trade between the United States and Japan and the consequent imposition of the Super 301 clause on Japan. Analyzing trade in telecommunications, the work traces the events that led to the Super 301 clause and the Strategic Impediments Initiatives. It also provides an in-depth analysis of GATT issues and what may be expected from the current Uruguay Round. Telecommunications deregulation and privatization in both countries are carefully assessed, as are the social, political, and cultural implications of the trade conflict.

Excerpt

The extraordinary dynamism of the Pacific region over the past decade has placed Japan in the lead in setting patterns of telecommunications technology and its usage as integral components of economic development. While the countries of North America and Europe are struggling to emerge from a recession, Japan and the Asian tigers are accumulating trade surpluses in world markets. Japan's gross national product (GNP) has outstripped that of Germany and its per capita GNP is higher than that in the United States. Japan is competing successfully in various industrial goods and in services like banking, trading, and information services. Its share in global trade is growing so rapidly that its prowess constitutes a threat to other economies such as those of Europe and the United States. Even as regionalism in trade is becoming more significant with the formation of the European Single Market and the North American Free Trade Agreement, Japan is growing concerned that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries may also follow the pattern of regional trade blocs, thus isolating the Japanese economy from all three free-trade areas. Underlying these challenges is the future role of Japan in the region. The ASEAN Summit held in 1992 failed to agree on the East Asian Economic Caucus; however, Japan continues to enjoy a trade surplus with both the United States and the ASEAN countries.

The United States, in the past, had held the virtual hegemony in international trade and technological advances. The United States, as the world leader in foreign trade, in foreign direct investment, in innovation, and in technology, was relied on by developing countries for assistance in technology transfer and trade preferences. Today . . .

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