Brain Plasticity and Behavior

Brain Plasticity and Behavior

Brain Plasticity and Behavior

Brain Plasticity and Behavior

Synopsis

There are few books devoted to the topic of brain plasticity and behavior. Most previous works that cover topics related to brain plasticity do not include extensive discussions of behavior. The first to try to address the relationship between recovery from brain damage and changes in the brain that might support the recovery, this volume includes studies of humans as well as laboratory species, particularly rats. The subject matter identifies a consistent correlation between specific changes in the brain and behavioral recovery, as well as various factors such as sex and experience that influence this correlation in consistent ways.

Evolving from a series of lectures given as the McEachran Lectures at the University of Alberta, this volume originally began as a summary of the lectures, but has expanded to include more background literature, allowing the reader to see the author's biases, assumptions, and hunches in a broader perspective. In writing this volume, the author had two goals in mind:

• to initiate senior undergraduates or graduate psychology, biology, neuroscience or other interested students to the issues and questions regarding the nature of brain plasticity, and

• to provide a monograph in the form of an extended summary of the work the author and his colleagues have done on brain plasticity and recovery of function.

Excerpt

This monograph evolved from a series of lectures given as the MacEachern Lectures at the University of Alberta in October 1993. Although this volume began as a summary of the lectures, it has expanded significantly to include more background literature that allows the reader to see my biases, assumptions, and hunches in a broader perspective.

My goal in writing this volume was twofold. First, I wanted to initiate the senior undergraduate or graduate psychology, biology, neuroscience, or other interested student to the issues and questions regarding the nature of brain plasticity. In particular, I wanted to focus on the issue of recovery of function after brain injury and the correlated changes in the brain. I was encouraged that there was a general interest in the question of brain plasticity and behavior by the positive response to an article that I wrote several years ago for American Psychologist. One advantage of a short article is that one can steer clear of complexities, and as I wrote this monograph I was aware of the pitfall of losing the simplicity of my original article. I have no doubt that parts of this volume may appear to some to be "overkill" on particular aspects of the topic, but it is my hope that the volume can be used as a starting point for senior undergraduate courses and graduate seminars on the topic of brain plasticity and recovery of function.

Second, I wanted to write this monograph in the form of an extended summary of the work that my colleagues and I have done on brain plasticity and recovery of function. It is seldom that one gets an opportunity to put together a lifetime's work on a single topic, as scientific articles are necessarily terse and textbooks must focus on the broader perspective. My interest in plasticity and behavior began in about 1972 and has taken numerous detours and followed . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.