Instructional Consultation

Instructional Consultation

Instructional Consultation

Instructional Consultation

Synopsis

Recent changes in policy and law, along with advances in research, are making it necessary for an increasing number of school psychologists, special educators, and teacher consultants to develop skills in areas other than psychoeducational assessment. In response to this need, many professionals and students are expanding their careers to include the field of instructional consultation -- the synthesis of school- based consultation techniques and a solid knowledge of effective instructional practices. This book examines the major themes of instruction and gives a step-by-step outline of the consultation process from referral to the final report. Recent changes in policy and law, along with advances in research, are making it necessary for an increasing number of school psychologists, special educators, and teacher consultants to develop skills in areas other than psychoeducational assessment. In response to this need, many professionals and students are expanding their careers to include the field of instructional consultation -- the synthesis of school- based consultation techniques and a solid knowledge of effective instructional practices. This book examines the major themes of instruction and gives a step-by-step outline of the consultation process from referral to the final report.

Excerpt

The concept of instructional consultation is beginning to surface in the literature of school psychology and special education. At the National Conference on Consultation Training (Alpert & Meyers, 1983), held in Montreal in 1980, Bergan and Schnaps (1983) presented a paper entitled, A Model for Instructional Consultation. They described instructional consultation as an extension of behavioral consultation techniques, to be "applied in situations in which the purpose of consultation is to modify teacher behavior to enhance the learning of all students in a class" (p. 105). Their use of the concept was largely limited in perspective to a combination of academic learning time variables and behavioral consultation, and the focus of their paper was on research examining verbal interactions between consultant and consultee. However, they underlined the potential for using consultation around instructional issues to modify teacher behavior for the purpose of enhancing the learning of all children, including those with academic learning problems.

The importance of a role in the instructional process for school psychologists has been defined in School Psychology: A Blueprint for Training and Practice (Ysseldyke et al., 1984), a document created to "help in the necessary redefinition of the role, functions, and training needs of school psychologists" (p. 2). As part of the necessary transformation of the role of the school psychologist envisioned in this futures document, several domains of knowledge were delineated. Among the domains presented were those related to instruction: "The school psychologist should be prepared to advise and consult on matters relating to the general improvement of instruction" (p. 11); and basic academic skills: "School psychologists should be able to help . . .

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