Latin American Journalism

Latin American Journalism

Latin American Journalism

Latin American Journalism

Synopsis

Produced to fill a gap in current knowledge about the state of journalism in Latin America, this timely book chronicles how recent changes toward democratization and privatization in the region have influenced mass media industries and the practice of journalism. Written as a tribute to earlier books about the development and status of Latin American news organizations, this text provides a readable overview of journalism in the area. Unlike those in previous works, these chapters are divided by issues and subject matter instead of by nations and regions. Each chapter concludes with a "spotlight" case study to illustrate the reading material. These features -- along with several easy-to- follow tables, topical examples suitable for class discussions, and a variety of sources including original interviews with media professionals -- all combine to form the most up-to-date book currently available on this constantly changing subject.

Excerpt

Only a few years ago, not many people would have predicted the political, economic, and social changes in the Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. But when democratic reform came to these nations, the world took notice. Since the beginning of the 1980s, Latin America experienced similar changes. Far less attention has been taken of the changes in Latin America than those in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. It seems that only when some natural or man-made disaster takes place south of the border, does the world take notice of events in that region. And then only for a short while.

This book was written as a tribute to earlier books about the development and status of Latin American news organizations and the practice of journalism in Latin America and the Caribbean. Two of those books had a major impact on the authors. Marvin Alisky Latin American Media: Guidance and Censorship (1981) and Robert N. Pierce Keeping the Flame (1979) each have served readers well since they were issued more than a decade ago. But events have changed drastically in the region since then, demanding a re-examination of the practice of journalism. Events changed rapidly even as we completed this book.

From our perhaps narrow vantage point in Miami, we kept track of events, interviewing numerous media professionals from the region as they passed through our town. We hope to provide a fair and complete overview of the subject through our travel to Latin America, through interviews with key publishers and broadcasters, and through our review of the ever-growing base of literature on Latin American mass communication. Our intent was to offer an overview of Latin American news media through analysis and interpretation of the major topics that concerned Latin American news media at the beginning of the 1990s.

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