Advances in Personality Assessment - Vol. 3

Advances in Personality Assessment - Vol. 3

Advances in Personality Assessment - Vol. 3

Advances in Personality Assessment - Vol. 3

Synopsis

In keeping with the goals of this series, which are to facilitate the rapid dissemination of important new developments in theory and research on all aspects of personality assessment, the eight chapters in this volume examine a wide range of topics. These include research investigations and clinical applications involving traditional assessment techniques -- such as the Rorschach and the MMPI-2 -- and promising but less known procedures. Specific topics examined in the individual chapters range from the assessment of appreciation of humor to assessment of marital distress. A review of the contents of this volume once again demonstrates the diversity in assessment philosophy, theoretical orientation, and research methodology that characterizes the field of personality assessment.

Excerpt

The major goal of this Series is to disseminate information about important new developments in theory and research on all aspects of personality assessment. In keeping with this goal, Volume 3 includes papers that describe new developments with traditional assessment instruments such as the Rorschach and Holtzman Ink Blot Techniques and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. It also includes intensive case studies, detailed reviews of research findings with situation-specific personality tests, and innovative applications of assessment center methodology in business and industry.

The contributors to this Volume approach personality assessment from a number of very different perspectives. In Chapter 1, Douglas W. Bray and Ann Howard trace the historical development of the assessment center method and point out the advantages of this approach in studying personality. They also describe some of the major findings in the Bell System's longitudinal studies of the personality characteristics of managers, and they report intriguing case examples to illustrate how motives influence performance.

The utility of projective techniques in investigations of developmental trends in personality over the life span and in the assessment of psychoanalytic concepts in seriously disturbed mental patients is demonstrated in Chapters 2, 3, and 4. The consistent age trends reported by Swartz, Reinehr, and Holtzman for five HIT variables provide vital information about personality development. The Lerners also identify distinctive developmental patterns that are related to both type and severity of psychopathological disturbance. In Chapter 4, Epstein and Kaplan report in-

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