The Behavioral Persuasion in Politics

The Behavioral Persuasion in Politics

The Behavioral Persuasion in Politics

The Behavioral Persuasion in Politics

Excerpt

The root is man. I don't think it is possible to say anything meaningful about the governance of man without talking about the political behavior of man--his acts, goals, drives, feelings, beliefs, commitments, and values. Man has built nations and empires, created customs and institutions, invented symbols and constitutions, made wars, revolutions, and peace. Politics is the study of why man finds it necessary or desirable to build government, of how he adapts government to his changing needs or demands, of how and why he decides on public policies. Politics is concerned with the conditions and consequences of human action.

A study of politics which leaves man out of its equations is a rather barren politics. Yet such is the propensity of man that he can consider his own creations without measuring them by himself. Political science has studied political ideas, values, customs, symbols, institutions, processes, and policies without reference to their creators for a long time, but the cost has been high. I do not want to belabor this point. I mention it only because the simple question I want to ask--Why do people behave politically as they do?

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