The Consequences of the War to Great Britain

The Consequences of the War to Great Britain

The Consequences of the War to Great Britain

The Consequences of the War to Great Britain

Excerpt

This is the concluding volume of the British Series in the Economic and Social History of the World War'. Begun just after the treaties of peace were signed, this co-operative effort to measure the economic cost of the War and to describe the displacement which it caused in the normal processes of civilization is now approaching completion. It covers, in greater or less detail, the effects of the War upon twenty-one countries. There are 24 volumes in the British Series and some 150 in the History as a whole. Planned with due regard to differences in history and outlook, the various national series differ in method of treatment and in scope; but most of the volumes are in the nature of a contemporary record. They were written by those who played some part in the conduct of affairs during the War, and who, as privileged observers, were able to bring first-hand or second-hand knowledge to bear upon the explanation of those elements in the war-time scheme of things which they described.

These monographs, consisting as they do of authoritative statement and interpretation of facts, should be of value to students of the future, who will often lack any other guide to those aspects of the economy and history of nations during the War. They deal with such subjects as the effect of the War upon governments, political and social conditions, industry, labour, finance, agriculture, commerce, education, health, morals, and crime. The volumes of analysis had to be prepared in the early post-war days, and for the very reason which has made it necessary to postpone the synthesis. The data had to be gathered and registered while it was still, to some extent, in its war-time environment, before the memory of the insistent need or harrowing anxieties of the critical days had become dimmed or obscured by later, peace-time preoccupations. On the other hand, the ultimate effect of war-time measures upon the fortunes of nations and the ways of living and thinking of their citizens could not be divined in the midst of the stress and strain of action. Even events themselves change their contours in the lengthening perspectives of history. It was not . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.