Lenin: The Man and His Work

Lenin: The Man and His Work

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Lenin: The Man and His Work

Lenin: The Man and His Work

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The world knows very little of the man who for two years has been the Premier of Russia. The London Times says that this is due to the natural reticence and aloofness of Lenin. "If Lenin appears to the average Englishman as a red-shirted, high-booted pirate-chief, the fault is chiefly of his own making."

Hardly. Lenin is not entirely to blame. The blockade and the British censorship have had considerable share in it. They completely severed Russia from the rest of the world. Even the Associated Press could not break through that censorship. It has never been accused of revolutionary leanings, but a large percentage of its mild cable despatches were regarded by the British as dangerous to the American people. The British held to be dangerous any facts that reflected favorably on the Soviet Government or its Premier.

Consequently, in lieu of facts about Lenin the public was served with fancies and leg­ ends by the "special correspondents" in Paris, London, Stockholm and Copenhagan.

In one cabled despatch Lenin would appear in the morning narrowly escaping out of the clutch of the enemy by leaping from an ar­ mored train in Siberia, while an afternoon despatch would reveal Lenin looking through the bars of his Moscow prison where he had been thrown and chained by the terrible Trotzky. The third, not to be outdone by this startling piece of news, would have Lenin with portfolio under his arm walking debonairly down the gang-plank of a Spanish steamer, landing at Barcelona. Individually the correspondents showed great inventive ingenuity but collectively they failed from lack of teamwork. They proved too much. To flit from Siberia to Moscow and then to Spain in the course of a few hours is more than a human performance. Lenin's detractors endowed him with omnipresence.

Earlier they had given him another attribute of Deity--omnipotence. For they said that Lenin through his coterie had organized the Soviets, and with them he had distilled poison into the minds of 15,000,000 soldiers and disintegrated the army. Then his little group had overthrown the Provisional Government and had led by the nose a nation of 180,000,000 up to the Treaty of Brest- Litovsk and made them sign it. Such prowess is not of man--it is superhuman.

He also seemed to be possessed of omniscience. There is more than a hint of it in the pitiful plaint of one of the factions pleading . . .

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