Security against War - Vol. 1

Security against War - Vol. 1

Security against War - Vol. 1

Security against War - Vol. 1

Excerpt

The first epoch of reconstruction under the Peace Treaties is now ended and the record is available. This book contains the narrative of one aspect of that epoch--political reconstruction through the settlement of international disputes.

This record of deeds constitutes the solid foundation upon which peace rests; it offers a body of specific data from which to view intelligently the future prospects of national security; it indicates the competence of the machinery employed to maintain peace; and the measure of justice which has prevailed in the settlement of conflicts between sovereign states. Finally it portrays the relative values of force and law in the adjudication of international controversies.

Part I of this narrative contains a description of the peace machinery in theory and in practice. Part II relates the history of each dispute, together with the application of the peace machinery to its settlement. Part III presents the evolution and record of the Permanent Court of International Justice, together with its relation to the Hague Organization and Conferences, as being the effort to substitute law for war. Part IV analyzes the pending proposals for future peace, including disarmament, the treaties of mutual assistance and of disarmament and security and the outlawry of war. The record thus presented is one of fact and endeavor, containing information from all parts of the world, which will be of service to those desirous of forming their opinions upon a knowledge of the situation with reference to international controversies since the war.

With panaceas this book is not concerned. Some may wish to improve the League of Nations or abolish the Conference of Ambassadors or extend the powers of the Court. Others, less interested in organization, may favor treaties of assistance, disarmament, or the outlawry of war. Still others may revert to the Hague Conferences or the extension of the Monroe Doctrine, while many dream of new expedients against war. But unless these various movements possess the intelligence born of a knowledge of European conditions and of the character of its people, and are guided by the significance of the events since the war, they will have very little practical value in the abolition of war. Such knowledge is to be found in the history of these controversies; and in the principles and precedents thus established.

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