The Coming Struggle for Peace

The Coming Struggle for Peace

The Coming Struggle for Peace

The Coming Struggle for Peace

Excerpt

The somewhat provocative title of this book should not lead the reader to expect to find in it more than it contains. This is not a book on peace, nor is it a blueprint for a new postwar order. It does not even attempt to survey the innumerable peace schemes proposed with equal zeal and conviction by professional and amateur planners alike. This book is simply a study of some of the internal problems of the United Nations, problems which have to be solved --and satisfactorily--if the peace which the United Nations intend to win is to become an enduring peace. And considering the short life of the United Nations as a unit, there is an abundance of these problems.

The "United Nations" dates back only to January 1, 1942, the day its birth certificate was registered in Washington, D. C., its birthplace. It was on the first day of the first year of the coalition war--less than a month after Pearl Harbor--that representatives of the three great powers, Great Britain, Soviet Russia, and China, came to the White House to sign with President Roosevelt the joint declaration which for the first time used the term "United Nations." With President Roosevelt acting as godfather, Assistant Secretary of State Adolf Berle, in the role of birth registration clerk, the next day invited to the State Department representatives of the other members of the association to be known as the United Nations.

The press did not immediately become aware of the historical significance of this new document. It took several days for the commentators and editors, and even longer for the public, to realize that a new attempt was being made to create a really New World Order after the victory that would end the war. Most people believed, and some of them still believe, that President Roosevelt was the father spiritual of the United Nations. This notion contributed to the confusion surrounding the United Nations' first tottering steps.

Neither President Roosevelt nor representatives of the other . . .

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